“Learning is, in essence, a positive feedback loop that self-perpetuates itself. It’s an incredible thing. It’s addictive and it’s empowering.” —Dr. Samantha Joye

More than 270 students participated in the UNC-Chapel Hill Doctoral Hooding Ceremony held on the morning of May 7 in the Dean E. Smith Center. The ceremony recognizes graduate students receiving their doctoral degrees. View the Doctoral Hooding Ceremony photo gallery

Samantha Joye, a leading researcher on the impact of oil and gas seepage in deep ocean environments, was the keynote speaker. Joye is the Georgia Athletic Association Professor in Arts and Sciences in the University of Georgia’s marine sciences department. She received her bachelor’s degree in biology, and her master’s and doctoral degrees in marine sciences from UNC-Chapel Hill.

“This day marks the beginning of your biggest journey,” Joye told the doctoral graduates. “Where you end up and what you do along the way will define your global being and consciousness. Be remarkable. Use your voice. As you leave here today, ask yourself a couple of questions: What will be my role in bettering the world? How will I make a difference? What will I be remembered for?”

Steve Matson, Graduate School Dean; Samantha Joye, keynote speaker; Chancellor Carol L. Folt; and Dylan Russell, GPSF president

From left to right: Steve Matson, Graduate School dean; Samantha Joye, keynote speaker; Chancellor Carol L. Folt; and Dylan Russell, Graduate and Professional Student Federation president

Dr. Samantha Joye

Keynote speaker Dr. Samantha Joye

Excerpts from Dr. Samantha Joye’s keynote address:

“Learning is, in essence, a positive feedback loop that self-perpetuates itself. It’s an incredible thing. It’s addictive and it’s empowering.”

“Don’t be a spectator, because life is too short and every day is precious. Embrace it and enjoy it. Give something back every day. Smile, always smile, even when you’re down. Because smiles are contagious and they come back at you. Talk to a stranger. Hold out your hand and lift somebody else up. Buy someone you don’t know a cup of coffee or a muffin. Because the smiles and happiness your actions generate in others will enlighten and fulfill your soul more than any amount of money or material goods ever could.”

“There’ll be times in your life when you’re faced with a very difficult choice or situation. You’ll be uncomfortable, even afraid, and your instinct might well be to duck and run. You have to think hard in such situations and decide whether you’re going to be a bystander or whether you’re going to engage; and when you decide to engage, you do so at 110 percent.”

History professor receives Faculty Award for Excellence in Doctoral Mentoring

Donald J. Raleigh receiving the Faculty Award for Excellence in Doctoral Mentoring from Graduate School Dean Steve Matson

Donald J. Raleigh (left) receiving the Faculty Award for Excellence in Doctoral Mentoring from Graduate School Dean Steve Matson

Donald J. Raleigh, the Jay Richard Judson distinguished professor of history at UNC-Chapel Hill, has received the 2016 Faculty Award for Excellence in Doctoral Mentoring.

The Graduate School presents the annual award to a faculty member who has: encouraged graduate students to establish their own records of scholarly activity, provided a supportive environment that brings forth the very best from students, and achieved a successful record of graduate degree completion among students he or she has advised.

Graduate School Dean Steve Matson presented the award to Raleigh, a renowned scholar within Russian history, at the ceremony. Matson said Raleigh is an outstanding mentor who gives talented students the confidence and capabilities they need to create valuable new knowledge and succeed as leaders in their academic fields.

Both a current and former graduate student nominated Raleigh for his award. One nomination letter said the following: “Don’s attitude toward mentoring has resulted in a real community of scholars, recognized and respected by our field of Russian history. He creates a cooperative atmosphere among his students, encouraging them to share knowledge, evaluate one another’s work and assist one another in the research field.”

From the other nomination letter: “I attribute my own decision to enroll at UNC to Don. His name came up repeatedly when I considered potential advisors, not just as one of the top scholars in the field of Russian history but also as an effective and transformative mentor.”

Raleigh has successfully mentored 21 doctoral students at Carolina.

Video of full Hooding Ceremony